Perinatal HIV Transmission and Route of Delivery

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Last updated March 30, 2015
Case Authors: 
David H. Spach, MD's picture
David H. Spach, MD
Professor of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Clinical Director
Northwest AIDS Education and Training Center
University of Washington School of Medicine 
Learning Objectives: 
  1. List 3 or more factors associated with increase risk of perinatal HIV transmission.
  2. Summarize indications for cesarean section delivery in HIV-infected pregnant women.

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References
  1. Recommendations for Use of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant HIV-1-Infected Women for Maternal Health and Interventions to Reduce Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States. Intrapartum Care: Intrapartum Antiretroviral Therapy/Prophylaxis. March 28, 2014
  2. International Perinatal HIV Group. The mode of delivery and the risk of vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1--a meta-analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies. The International Perinatal HIV Group. N Engl J Med. 1999;340:977-87.
  3. European Mode of Delivery Collaboration. Elective caesarean-section versus vaginal delivery in prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission: a randomised clinical trial. Lancet. 1999;353:1035-9.
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