Perinatal HIV Transmission and Route of Delivery

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Last updated May 14, 2016
Case Authors: 
David H. Spach, MD's picture
Real name: 
David H. Spach, MD
Professor of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Clinical Director, Mountain West AIDS Education and Training Center
University of Washington School of Medicine
Disclosures: 
None
Learning Objectives: 
  1. List 3 or more factors associated with increase risk of perinatal HIV transmission.
  2. Summarize indications for cesarean section delivery in HIV-infected pregnant women.

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References
  1. Panel on Treatment of HIV-Infected Pregnant Women and Prevention of Perinatal Transmission. Recommendations for Use of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant HIV-1-Infected Women for Maternal Health and Interventions to Reduce Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States. Intrapartum Care: Intrapartum Antiretroviral Therapy/Prophylaxis. August 6, 2015.
  2. International Perinatal HIV Group. The mode of delivery and the risk of vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1--a meta-analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies. The International Perinatal HIV Group. N Engl J Med. 1999;340:977-87.
  3. European Mode of Delivery Collaboration. Elective caesarean-section versus vaginal delivery in prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission: a randomised clinical trial. Lancet. 1999;353:1035-9.
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