Prophylaxis for Toxoplasma Encephalitis

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Last updated March 14, 2015
Case Authors: 
Robert D. Harrington, MD
Professor of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
University of Washington School of Medicine
Learning Objectives: 
  1. Identify the ways in which humans can acquire Toxoplasma gondii infection.
  2. Understand the criteria for discontinuing prophylaxis for Toxoplasma encephalitis.

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References
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